ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING (ELT/ESL/ELL)


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Our 2016 Professional Development Webinar series was a huge success! More than 2,200 teachers attended from around the world. The series offered seven Webinars, presented by authors, series editors, and consultants. The Webinar topics ranged from academic skills for college transition and grammar practice techniques, to English for academic purposes, and the Global Scale of English.

If you missed any of the Webinars, don't worry. Every session was recorded; you can scroll down for information on the Webinars and links to watch the recorded sessions. (Registration required to access the recordings.)

See below for links to the recorded Webinars.



DateTimeSessionPresenterWatch Now
Monday, October 17, 2016 12:00 p.m. EDT English is Served! Catering to Lower-Level Students' Academic Needs Ken Beatty Watch Now
Tuesday, October 18, 2016 12:00 p.m. EDT Preparing ELL Learners for the Challenges of Rigorous Academic Writing at the University Level Maggie Sokolik Watch Now
Tuesday, October 18, 2016 4:00 p.m. EDT Supporting ELL Transition to Communicating at the University Level Robyn Brinks Lockwood Watch Now
Wednesday, October 19, 2016 12:00 p.m. EDT The Global Scale of English: Research Support for Learning Outcomes Sara Davila Watch Now
Wednesday, October 19, 2016 3:00 p.m. EDT Five Frameworks for Developing Listening Skills Michael Rost Watch Now
Thursday, October 20, 2016 12:00 p.m. EDT A Skills Repertoire for Successful University Reading Lawrence J. Zwier Watch Now
Friday, October 21, 2016 3:00 p.m. EDT New Insights into Practice for the Grammar Classroom Stacy Hagen Watch Now
English is Served! Catering to Lower-Level Students' Academic Needs
Monday, October 17, 2016 · 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m. Eastern Daylight Tim
Presenter: Ken Beatty
Abstract:
Universities are increasingly admitting students into pre-degree programs. In these programs, students upgrade both their general English language skills and their skills in spoken and written academic English. The stakes in such programs are extremely high as students want to quickly segue into their degree studies. This creates pressure on teachers who have to balance intensive instruction with high student motivation and expectations. This talk lets teachers consider a range of A2+ Level student profiles and explore how textbook materials can be adapted to address each one's needs. The presenter will mention the Pearson Global Scale of English, for a more granular assessment of student levels.

Dr. Ken Beatty, teacher trainer, writer, and TESOL Professor, has promoted best teaching and learning practices from primary through university levels in 300+ sessions in 28 countries. Ken is author of 130+ textbooks, including books in the Pearson series Learning English for Academic Purposes (LEAP).

Preparing ELL Learners for the Challenges of Rigorous Academic Writing at the University Level
Tuesday, October 18, 2016 · 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m. Eastern Daylight Tim
Presenter: Maggie Sokolik
Abstract:
Many English language learners have perfected the art of the highly structured essay. Often written in five paragraphs, designed to address specific questions with clear, concise information, or based on experience or general knowledge, these essays typically don't meet the demands of university writing. From the first day of class, university students receive assignments requiring them to work independently to prepare detailed literature reviews, research papers, lab reports, or articles with very little guidance as to a correct "answer." In this session, we will explore the types of writing challenges students face, and examine how to help learners build skills to organize, research, and write about challenging academic topics to meet rigorous university standards.

Maggie Sokolik holds a BA in anthropology from Reed College and an MA in romance linguistics and a PhD in applied linguistics from UCLA. She is the author of over 20 ESL and composition textbooks. She has taught at MIT, Harvard, Texas A&M, and currently UC Berkeley, where she is director of College Writing Programs. She has developed and taught several popular MOOC courses in English language writing and literature. She is the founding editor of TESL-EJ, a peer reviewed journal for ESL/EFL professionals, one of the first online journals. She travels frequently to speak about grammar, writing, and instructor education. She lives in the San Francisco Bay area, where she and her husband play bluegrass music.

Supporting ELL Transition to Communicating at the University Level
Tuesday, October 18, 2016 · 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. Eastern Daylight Tim
Presenter: Robyn Brinks Lockwood
Abstract:
Many English language learners spend years preparing to achieve a specific goal: earning a degree in their chosen field at a university in an English speaking country. Each year, millions of students successfully achieve admission to university programs. However, even with extensive preparation, many students find their English is still not "good enough" when arriving to start their course of study and take additional English courses to transition into university life. Why does this happen and what do students need to be fully prepared to achieve success? In this session, we will explore the challenges students face and look at how teachers can further support the development of essential communication skills that will successfully prepare students for university success.

Robyn Brinks Lockwood teaches courses in English listening, speaking, and writing for international graduate students. She is also the coordinator of the American Language and Culture undergraduate summer program. She is an active member of the international TESOL organization, serves as Chair of the Book Publications Committee, and is a past chair of the Materials Writers Interest Section. She is a frequent presenter at TESOL regional and international conferences. Robyn has edited and written numerous textbooks for writing, speaking, and listening English courses and TOEFL preparation as well as ancillary materials to support teachers.

The Global Scale of English: Research Support for Learning Outcomes
Wednesday, October 19, 2016 · 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m. Eastern Daylight Tim
Presenter: Sara Davila
Abstract:
The Common European Framework for Languages is a collection of descriptors covering 6 levels of proficiency - from A1 to C2. The original design was narrow, focusing on general English communication. Building on the CEFR, the Global Scale of English (GSE) creates a more granular set of descriptors to exploring English across multiple domains. This presentation examines how to use the GSE to conduct an analysis of current course offerings, look for gaps in course content, and provide insight into curriculum challenges. Attendees will experience a hands-on how-to for using the GSE to enhance course offerings.

Sara Davila is a teacher, teacher trainer, and educational consultant who has been working in the field of language and language development for over 12 years. She has worked in the US and abroad as a language teacher and learning expert in the field of language acquisition. Ms. Davila has done extensive research on performance assessment, communicative based instructional strategies, and learning theory, with presentations, workshops, and articles around each topic. She is currently working with Pearson ELT as the Learning Expert in Higher Education for global English language products. Ms. Davila continues to contribute to the field through her website, which contains presentations, free lesson plans, and free worksheets for teachers, which can be found at www.saradavila.com.

Five Frameworks for Developing Listening Skills
Wednesday, October 19, 2016 · 3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. Eastern Daylight Tim
Presenter: Michael Rost
Abstract:
This webinar will identify concrete strategies for helping your students develop their listening. Author Michael Rost will describe five frameworks for teaching listening: affective, bottom up, top down, interactive, and autonomous. For each frame, he will outline relevant research that supports each style of listening development. Michael will also illustrate activities that you can use with your students. The goal of the webinar is for you to find specific ways to integrate all five frameworks into your teaching.

Michael Rost, principal author of Pearson English Interactive, has been active in the areas of language teaching, learning technology and language acquisition research for over 25 years. His interest in bilingualism and language education began in the Peace Corps in West Africa and was fueled during his 10 years as an educator in Japan and extensive touring as a lecturer in East Asia and Latin America. Formerly on the faculty of the TESOL programs at Temple University and the University of California, Berkeley, Michael now works as an independent researcher, author, and speaker based in San Francisco. Michael is the author of critically acclaimed works on second language development, including Teaching and Researching Listening (Routledge) and Active Listening (Routledge), Dr. Rost's interests focus on spoken interaction and listening. He is also author or series editor of a number of successful EFL/ESL courses, including the global series Worldview and English Firsthand, as well as the academic listening series, Contemporary Topics (Pearson).

A Skills Repertoire for Successful University Reading
Thursday, October 20, 2016 · 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m. Eastern Daylight Tim
Presenter: Lawrence J. Zwier
Abstract:
Contemporary research into the characteristics of high-level English academic reading strongly implies that a certain set of skills is essential. Among these are proficiency in (1) handling a high volume of reading; (2) building true fluency -including automaticity; (3) working with "grown-up" vocabulary (including multiword units, loanwords, etc.); (4) dealing with difficult content and unfamiliar topics; and (5) apprehending cultural background (including culture-specific metaphor). All of these are necessary in order for advanced students to "sit at the grown-up table" and compete in academic settings. This presentation details how a comprehensive repertoire of high-level reading skills is developed and strengthened in Pearson's just-launched University Success series.

Lawrence J. Zwier is an associate director of the English Language Center, Michigan State University. He holds a bachelor's degree in English literature from Aquinas College, Grand Rapids, MI, and an MA in TESL from the University of Minnesota. He has taught ESL/EFL at universities in Saudi Arabia, Malaysia, Japan, Singapore, and the United States. He is the author of numerous ELT textbooks, mostly about reading and vocabulary, and also writes nonfiction books about history and geography for middle school and high school students. He is married with two children and lives in Okemos, Michigan.

New Insights into Practice for the Grammar Classroom
Friday, October 21, 2016 · 3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. Eastern Daylight Tim
Presenter: Stacy Hagen
Abstract:
Advances in cognitive science are shedding new light on the importance of practice. Stacy Hagen, co-author of the Azar-Hagen grammar series, will discuss how research from cognitive science, with a focus on student success, has informed the new, 5th edition of Understanding and Using English Grammar.

Stacy Hagen is the author of numerous books in the areas of grammar, listening, speaking, and pronunciation. Since 2004, she has been co-author of the Azar-Hagen grammar series. Her classroom teaching experience includes intensive ESL, immigrant, refugee, and high school students, as well as teacher-training courses.

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