Vocabulary Thursdays (with Joanna): Normalization vs. Normality

Let’s practice!

1. One of the impacts of COVID-19 has been the _______ ( normalization / normality ) of working from home.

2. We eagerly await a return of pre-pandemic _______ ( normalization / normality ).


ANSWER KEY: 1. normalization; 2. normality

Vocabulary Thursdays (with Joanna): Expressions with ‘rain’

It is said that April showers bring May flowers, so let’s practice some expressions with rain.

It's raining cats and dogs

it’s raining cats and dogs = it’s raining very heavily

to be rained in = to have to do something inside instead of outside because of bad weather

rain or shine = something is happening regardless of the situation (typically weather)

rain date = an alternate event date in case the weather is bad

rain on one’s parade = to spoil one’s plans, excitement, or pleasure

to take rain check = to not be able to accept an offer or invitation now, but to be able to do so in the future

to save for a rainy day = to save something (typically money) for a time when you may need it unexpectedly


Joanna Rodzen-Hickey

Joanna Rodzen-Hickey has been an ESL teacher and consultant for nearly 20 years. She has taught English at numerous universities and community colleges in New Jersey and currently teaches at the Hackettstown High School in Hackettstown, NJ.

Vocabulary Thursdays (with Joanna)

Estimate

The verb estimate means to roughly calculate the number or value of something. 

For example, Let’s estimate how many marbles there are in the jar.

The noun ‘estimate’ means a rough calculation of the number or value of something.

For example: According to Luke’s estimate, the kitchen renovation is going to cost us about ten thousand dollars.

Note that the pronunciation of the verb ‘estimate’ /ˈɛs təˌmeɪt/ is different from the pronunciation of the noun ‘estimate’ /ˈɛs tə mɪt/.

Can you use estimate in a sentence? Add yours in the comments 🙂


Joanna Rodzen-Hickey

Joanna Rodzen-Hickey has been an ESL teacher and consultant for nearly 20 years. She has taught English at numerous universities and community colleges in New Jersey and currently teaches at the Hackettstown High School in Hackettstown, NJ.

Vocabulary Thursdays (with Joanna)

Economic vs. Economical

Economical describes something that helps you to keep your expenses low.

Economic describes something related to the economy. 

Now try to complete these two sentences. 

1. My new car is very _______ ( economic / economical ) to run. My gas bill is now much lower.

2. The pandemic has had a negative _______ ( economic / economical ) impact on the restaurant industry.


Here’s the answer key. 1. economical; 2. economic. Did you get it right? Now, you try it! Create sentences with these words. Post them in comments.


Joanna Rodzen-Hickey

Joanna Rodzen-Hickey has been an ESL teacher and consultant for nearly 20 years. She has taught English at numerous universities and community colleges in New Jersey and currently teaches at the Hackettstown High School in Hackettstown, NJ.